Evolution of Peppered Moths During Industrial Revolution

What happened to the peppered moths during the Industrial Revolution?

Scientists have discovered the specific mutation that famously turned moths black during the Industrial Revolution. In an iconic evolutionary case study, a black form of the peppered moth rapidly took over in industrial parts of the UK during the 1800s, as soot blackened the tree trunks and walls of its habitat.

Which process took place during this time?

Black form of the peppered moth rapidly took over in industrial parts of the UK during the 1800s as a result of soot blackening the tree trunks and walls of its habitat.

Explanation

Moths are insects that are closely related to butterflies and both belong to the Lepidoptera Order. The difference between a butterfly and a moth is more than just taxonomy. Sometimes the names Rhopalocera (butterfly) and Heterocera (moth) are used to formalize their differences. There are various types of moths such as Death's-head Hawkmoth, Actias luna moth, Atlas Attacus atlas, Emperor Gum Moth, Polyphemus Moth, and the famous Peppered moth.

During the Industrial Revolution, the peppered moths experienced a significant change in their population due to environmental factors. The mutation that turned moths black allowed the black form of the peppered moth to thrive in the industrial areas of the UK where soot pollution darkened their surroundings. This process is a classic example of natural selection where the environment favored the survival and reproduction of moths with darker coloration.

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